Secrets of Modern IT Management

As technologies and methodologies have advanced, a lot of things have changed. So it’s natural that in the revolution of new processes and methodologies in the IT industry, also leadership and management models must be developed in order to be able to meet new challenges. I will briefly discuss about probably two best-known methodologies, ITSM/ITIL® and DevOps, and also correct some misunderstandings.

“Choose your side: ITSM/ITIL or DevOps?”

Headlines like that seem to become more and more common in today’s IT Industry, where organizations are struggling with ever-growing demands; Just On Time –deliveries, resourcing, predicting the future & markets, social media’s opinions, end-user requirements, and of course the need for profitable business.. And then a faceless consultant steps onboard and promises to solve all the problems with yet another “-ism”. While some time ago the “ism” was ITIL, nowadays it’s often DevOps with a touch of some other Agile –derivated method like Kanban or V-model.

Now, who do you believe? Does a highly structured methodology like ITSM/ITIL solve your problems or is it DevOps that releases your internal beast and assures your products and services are top-notch quality?

While some time ago the “ism” was ITIL, nowadays it’s often DevOps with a touch of some other Agile –derivated method like Kanban or V-model.

Correcting common ITIL and DevOps –related Misconceptions

In my latest blog text I wrote about common Misconceptions people have about Cloud Services, so I can continue writing about misconceptions, this time about the ITIL vs. DevOps –combat.. ..which really should not exist in the first place.

ITIL is set of guidelines, the best practices. It’s highly process-oriented approach on organizing the IT Services, including life cycle phases from Service Strategy to Continual Service Improvement. ITIL has somewhat gained reputation as a bureaucratic giant with enormous requirements for documentation while every function should have a lot of resources available for 24/7.

Partly the reputation is deserved, but largely it’s also about misunderstanding the paradigm: ITIL is about a set of guidelines. It’s like a toolbox where you choose the best and most suitable practices – not the whole nine yards. You don’t need to implement all the aspects of ITIL available in order to call your Services “being aligned” with ITIL.

On the other hand, whereas ITIL is missing the essential software development methodologies, DevOps comes in.

DevOps concentrates in software development and delivery process emphasizing on filling the silos between the development and operational phase.

DevOps emphasizes modern sw developmental actions such as continuous integration, testing, deployment and in a way blows new spirit to the old’n’ good sw development industry. DevOps introduces a new kind of culture where the need for collaboration and teamwork is highly appreciated. At the same time DevOps requires a bit different approach to leadership.

I’ve already written about the loopholes and demerits of DevOps here, so I won’t repeat myself.

So, what’s it gonna be: ITSM/ITIL or DevOps?

In case you didn’t quite get it, there is no idea in putting these two against each other, because for the most part they are solving different issues!

I suggest taking the best from the two approaches. ITIL is still today – by far – the best set of guidelines for running the IT operations, but I can recommend DevOps especially from the SW development point of view without forgetting DevOps’ main idea of covering the silos between the development and operations’ phases.

I suggest taking the best from the two approaches.

Attention! Lead your troops General!

How should DevOps –team’s management be organized? Some people say employees shouldn’t be controlled in any way but they should be given a 100% freedom to do their job, while others are on the opinion that the working hours shall be measured and more or less control is needed in order to get the results.

While there are a number of great posts written about managing a DevOps “teams”, for example here and here, there’s remarkably less articles addressing the challenge of leadership, leading the people in the holistic perspective.

 

The majority of executives today probably share the opinion, that when it comes to leading a specialist organization in the IT industry, a traditional  line-organizational management model is dead, because it doesn’t provide adequate set of tools to support leadership in modern IT environment. Those modern, self-guided teams are on the other hand eagerly saying they don’t need to be managed. Don’t listen to them, they don’t know what they are saying!

More than ever, in the era of Agile SW development there’s a pressing need for (good) leadership! A distinguished DevOps team can be working effectively without any outside guidance as long as someone is paying their salaries and bonuses. But bear in mind that a hundred sprints with huge amount of new features in the software don’t necessarily provide anything useful.

Those modern, self-guided teams are on the other hand eagerly saying they don’t need to be managed. Don’t listen to them, they don’t know what they are saying!

Leading and orchestrating the big picture of SW development is crucial for organization’s success. Can you cut it or is your organization going downfall?

1st level issues

To be able to even remotely manage your Orchestra, the following essential 1st level issues must be addressed:

  • What’s in the pipeline (or backlog if you wish)?
  • What’s currently under development?
  • Will the upcoming new features correspond the requirements agreed on with a customer (no matter internal or external customer)?
  • Do the outcomes of your SW development (both released and those still in the backlog or under development) match the organization’s strategic goals? (Assuming there ARE strategic goals defined, of course!)

Now that your things are basically going as planned, you can move on to the next level in management issues. Even though they are 2nd level issues, they are very important. Ignore the possible problems on level 2 and they will become 1st level problems in a way or another.

Ignore the possible problems on level 2 and they will become 1st level problems in a way or another.

2nd level issues

  • Outside the clear SW development issues you have of course other issues to be taken care of, i.e.
    • Resourcing
      • Are you certain people are in their appropriate positions? Need to make any changes?
    •  Sales
      • Are your sales personnel getting deals closed – short or longer term?
    • Hr
      • What’s the rotation speed of your personnel in your organization? Is there constantly coming new people in while those who have stayed longer are leaving? Should you do something about it and if not, why not?
      • Benefits and salaries: are you competitive against your fellow competitors?
    • Business
      • Is your business profitable or are you creating loss?
    • Customer satisfaction
      • Do your customers keep coming back to you or are they changing the supplier?
    • Legal issues
      • Are your legal & compliance issues in order?

The list goes on and on, but the message is clear: leave 2nd and lower levels unnoticed and they will eventually become 1st level problems.

Things listed above are only the tip of an iceberg, but I wanted to shake the buzzed thoughts that a modern SW Development running Agile methods only needs very little management if at all. That’s one of the risks in a well-welded DevOps team; it becomes too self-assertive and slowly ceases to consider the surrounding reality.

More than ever, there’s need for brilliant leadership and management! If someone is challenging my thesis about this, I’ll be glad to participate in the debate.

 

Pictures are from Pixabay.

ITIL® is a Registered Trade Mark of AXELOS Limited.

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