SIAM – toolwise considerations (reporting)

Tools in the multi-supplier environment

I was watching a video ”Talking ITSM & SIAM in different languages” on Cherwell web pages with PhD Ms. Tuuli Sutinen as a guest and AllthingITSM’s Simone Jo Moore, Kirstie Magowan, and James Finister were the other participants. They were discussing about various things, but what I paid attention to was Tuuli’s notifications about SIAM and the question of different tools in the multi-supplier environment.

I think Tools is one of the most essential things that make a difference between success and failure in SIAM.

Why’s that?

Let’s assume you are the SIAM Operator, responsible for delivering end-to-end services to the customer. Everything is ready: customer knows what they are doing and why, their business requirements have been carefully considered, and all the SLA contracts and underpinning contracts with suppliers and other stakeholders have been agreed on. Just like discussed in my previous blog text SIAM – The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.

Customer reporting

The Governance model says you are reporting to the customer once a month, and it’s time for you to prepare the very first service level reports. In order to simplify the issue a little, let’s focus on the idea of reporting about services performance.

Now, what do you actually do?

Suppliers deliver the reports to you. As this is the first time you haven’t probably managed to agree about the common design and layout, not to mention the details just yet and you will receive reports with different styles with different number ratios, dimensions, charts etc. etc.

Ok, you probably manage to collect the reports and manually edit a slideset which will somewhat satisfy the customer’s needs. And the numbers are good, of course, it helps here. J

As this is the first time you haven’t probably managed to agree about the common design and layout, not to mention the details just yet and you will receive reports with different styles with different number ratios, dimensions, charts etc. etc.

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At the same time you know that this practice has absolutely no future whatsoever. You can not be editing n pieces of different reports templates on Excel, and/or PowerPoint or KeyNote every single month. There’s no way you could do it and neither makes it any sense.

Improving reporting

A quick win might be to agree with suppliers to deliver the reports on templates you have provided them. That might help a little bit and at least those different reports might be of the same style, so your manual reports compiling work might go down ~ 80%.

Now that’s a lot better and you could maybe live with the situation.. No, you don’t want to settle with that arrengement.

A Finnish IT Company Tieto has stated it quite clearly: ”Good SIAM (Service Integration and Management) tools support the wide range of SIAM processes in a multivendor environment. Because the integration layer needs to support all vendors, present and future, industry-standard interfaces are a must.”

I’d recommend make the necessary integrations between your reporting tool and the suppliers’ systems. Don’t think about ”saving money” here!

Reporting relies heavily on the ITSM tool in order to gain necessary ticket data. In addition to that you most probably need another tool (hopefully integrated with the ITSM tool) or a comprehensive add-on with extensive data analysis capabilities to be able to report an overall situation of the services to the customer.

I’d recommend make the necessary integrations between your reporting tool and the suppliers’ systems. Don’t think about ”saving money” here!

Don’t forget about the status of the other services: You might also need reports about server/services availability, information security, response time of your services etc.

You might actually drown into the river of ever-growing reports. That’s why I would try to agree with the customer about 4-6 the most important reports and make sure those will always be handled, while the other reports might be stashed into the nice-to-know pile.

Customer’s dashboard?

But how about customer’s view? Should your customer have an own view on the tool to be able to check the situation every now and then – and ask questions about their observations?

What’s your opinion?

[ ] Yes!!! Of course they should! They could monitor the situation whenever they want to and they might notice something the SIAM Operator doesn’t.

[ ] Why not. Who would it hurt?

[ ] They don’t need it because they can always ask about the current situation from their SIAM Operator.

[ ] Absolutely not. Customer doesn’t even want it.

What is the correct answer? I don’t know! There are some issues I can address, though. Customer has decided to go with the SIAM model, so you can jump to the conclusion they don’t want to be actively monitoring the situation all the time. They rely on their SIAM Operator. Then on the other hand, I wouldn’t be too surprised if your customer would some time want to see or check out something, so maybe categorically denying the possibility might not be a correct answer either.

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There’s no clear-cut simple answer. If your customer wants the view on the dashboard, that can probably be arranged, but if they hate the idea, they have the right to do just that.

Please note: I was only discussing about reporting –related tools here. There are much more into it than this, for example CMDB tools, Asset Management, centralized Event Management, Capacity, Demand and Licence Management tools. I might write about them someday.

Recommendations

So you have read all the way down here and I haven’t told you what is the best tool money could possibly buy? Sorry to tell you, but it depends on so many things it would be impossible to list all the available reporting tools let alone the situation factors here. I would, however, lean on to Remedy’s ITSM tools, or maybe ServiceNow toolset, and power them with some rock solid BI-reporting tool. But what suits for me might not suit for somebody else.

However, one thing is for sure: Tools themselves won’t do the job for you, but without proper tools you are doomed to fail. So don’t underestimate the importance of tools!

Pictures are from Pixabay.

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